Intan Paramaditha

Biography

Intan Paramaditha is an Indonesian fiction writer and academic based in Sydney, whose works focus on the intersection between gender and sexuality, culture and politics. Her short story collection Apple and Knife, translated into English by Stephen J. Epstein, takes subversive feminist horror to new levels, and was published by Brow Books (Australia) and Harvill Secker (UK) in 2018. Gentayangan (The Wandering), her debut novel on travel and displacement where readers choose their own narrative path, was selected as Tempo Best Literary Work for Prose Fiction in 2017. The novel received the PEN Translates Award from English PEN and the PEN/ Heim Translation Fund Grant from PEN America, and it will be also be published by Harvill Secker in 2020. Intan was the winner of the Kompas Best Short Story Award in 2013 and the co-author of horror anthology Kumpulan Budak Setan (The Devil’s Slaves Club, 2010), with Eka Kurniawan and Ugoran Prasad. She has been invited to international festivals and academic forums and is actively involved in several feminist projects focusing on cultural activism in Indonesia. She holds a Ph.D. from New York University and teaches Media and Film Studies at Macquarie University.

@sihirperempuan

http://intanparamaditha.org/

 

Apple and Knife EN

 

Intan Paramadhita Gentayangan

Intan Paramaditha Spinner of the Darkness

Bibliography

Indonesian Women Writers (Regiospectra)
Spinner of Darkness & Other Tales (Lontar Foundation)
Apple and Knife (Harvill Secker)

Awards

2005
Khatulistiwa Literary Award (shortlisted)
2013
Kompas Best Short Story Award
2017
Tempo Best Literary Work for Prose Fiction
2018/9
PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grant

Related blog posts:

INDONESIA FOCUS: Q+A Intan Paramaditha

Ellie Steel, senior editor at Harvill Secker poses questions to Indonesian writer Intan Paramaditha ahead of her appearance at The London Book Fair.

PODCAST: Intro to Indonesian Literature

Listen as Georgina Godwin explores the rich literary and cultural heritage of Indonesia with Annabel Gallop and Feby Indirani at the British Library.

See all blog posts